Whalewatching with “The Greatest”

Pacific Whale Foundation was founded in 1980, in Makena, Maui, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Our roots are embedded in credible research studies, backed by effective education and critical conservation programs. Through the years, Pacific Whale Foundation has grown to become “the people’s whale organization.” Each year Pacific Whale Foundation takes nearly 300,000 supporters out on the water to experience whales “face-to-fluke,” or marine life “face-to-fin.” Our supporters come from all regions of the globe, and are of every race, color, creed, religion and political persuasion.

We have worked successfully to bridge the chasm of hard science by bringing scientific findings to the public to comprehend and act upon. We have engaged and enlisted the support of the public in a worthy and winnable cause: to save whales and their ocean home.

During the last three decades I have had some incredible whale experiences at Pacific Whale Foundation. People always ask me “what was the best whalewatching experience you ever had?” or “tell me about your most amazing whale experience.” Having spent thousands of hours on the ocean in the presence of whales, it really is hard to choose just one to single out as “the greatest” whale experience.

Frankly, I hope that experience has yet to happen. It is what drives me to discover, to learn more, and to seek out new venues to study whales. My experiences with ‘Migaloo’, the only all-white humpback whale in the world have been incredible and awe-inspiring. So too has been the time I spent underwater with humpback whales – most notably the time a curious calf gathered me in his pec fins and tried to carry me down to his waiting mother, literally taking my breath away.

When I reflect on my experiences with the whales, however, it is really my shared experiences watching whales with people I recall most fondly. In 1981, when we were a fledgling organization, 112 fourth graders from Kihei Elementary raised $3,800 (all in quarters!) for our research efforts. That whalewatch from Ma’alaea Harbor with those kids (whose kids are now adults going on whalewatches with Pacific Whale Foundation with their kids) will forever live fresh in my memory.

There have been hundreds of similar experiences that motivate and remind me of how sound and just our mission is. Last evening, Ocean Voyager’s sunset whalewatch, was another poignant reminder. It was a perfect evening for a whalewatch — light winds, clear skies, calm seas, plenty of whales, a perfect sunset and a glorious full moon. A picture perfect whalewatch experienced by myself and 92 other passengers, including “The Greatest,” Muhammad Ali, and his dear friend, singer, songwriter and actor Kris Kristofferson.

Continue reading

Mugged on the first Ultimate Whalewatch of 2015

On January 13th, the research team ran the first Ultimate Whalewatch cruise of the 2014/2015 whale season. Mother Nature was on our side that day, with perfect calm weather conditions.

Over the past week or so, the research team had been sighting more and more humpback whales in Ma’alaea Bay, including mother-calf pairs, so our 30 guests were in for a good whalewatch trip on Ocean Liberty.

As expected, a few whale pods were sighted a few minutes into the trip. At a later stage, we were even spoiled for choice, with whales left, right and center. Captain Curtis decided to follow one of the competition pods that displayed a lot of surface activity, very close to Ma’alaea Harbor and Sugar Beach. That decision paid off.

Over time, the number of escorts dwindled down from five to just two. At one point, one of the adults, presumed to be the female in the original pod, approached the vessel so close that, when it exhaled, the blow hit a few passengers. The whale then slowly swam under the vessel, giving everyone on board enough time to admire the sheer size of this animal. What a great photo opportunity that was.

In Hawai’i, any vessel must wait until a pod is further than 100 yards before being able to move. This particular individual approached the vessel several times, repeating the same behavior, to the delight of passengers and crew. This is called mugging. Although mugging tends to be observed more in Hervey Bay, Australia, than in Maui, this season it seems that more and more vessels are getting mugged by humpback whales. Being mugged by a whale was a new and unique experience for passengers and some members of the crew. For others, over 30 minutes was a new record. No one seemed to mind that we were running late to get back to the harbor.

Let’s hope that this incredible experience is a good omen for the rest of the whale season! If you are on Maui before mid-April, please come and join us on an Ultimate Whalewatch eco-cruise.

Our Experts Make the Difference

What sets Pacific Whale Foundation eco-cruises apart from other standard ocean tours? If you already joined us on one of our many Eco-Adventures then you already know the answer. It’s our talented and passionate vessel staff.

Every Pacific Whale Foundation Eco-Adventure cruise is led by a team of certified Marine Naturalists, all of whom hold graduate or undergraduate degrees in marine biology, ecology or related sciences. In addition, our staff must complete our rigorous certification program, which includes testing their knowledge about Hawaii’s marine environment, local geography and culture, presentation skills and Red Cross CPR, First Aid and Lifesaving Certifications. You can now meet our team of experts on our website.

Ocean Spirit approaching destination Oahu

Ocean Spirit’s current location:

Captain John Patti reports:

“Delivery is coming along as planned. We’re just within 7 hundred miles of Koolina marina now and have enjoyed mostly fair seas over the pacific leg. The presence of a head current and lack of wind affect the arrival time. We need to increase fuel efficiency between here and Oahu. Arrival time estimate remains in the realm of our expectation, December 11-12.”