Meet our new adoption whales!

Pacific Whale Foundation has two new humpback whales from our North Pacific Humpback Whale Catalog that are available for a symbolic adoption.

Makena is an adoption humpback whale that was named in honor of Greg Kaufman, the Founder of Pacific Whale Foundation.  This whale represents the long-term research Greg did to promote ocean conservation and his effort to be a voice for protecting whales. Makena was first seen in Maui waters as an adult in 1997.  During this first sighting, Pacific Whale Foundation researchers photographed Makena in a surface active pod with five other whales, including a calf.  In 2014, Makena was sighted again in the 4-island region and a photograph of its tail flukes was taken by a member of the public and donated to the research department.  The story of this whale perfectly encapsulates Greg Kaufman’s legacy;  combining our dedicated research study with a citizen scientist program, and promoting marine education and conservation through our animal adoption program.

Sally is a female humpback whale that has become famous in the Maui area thanks to her unique “fluke-up” behavior.  The “fluke-up” behavior is rarely seen in Hawaiian waters, and is referred to by some as “sailing”. Sally was first observed by our researchers exhibiting the “fluke-up” behavior with her calf nearby in 2016.  No one fully understands the purpose of this behavior, but in 2018, this whale once again had a calf and several times throughout the season was seen displaying the same posture. Photos of Sally were donated to the research department from one of our Keiki Whalewatches, and from Naturalist Josh Wittmer aboard PacWhale Eco-Adventures whalewatch.

 

Want to know more about these amazing individuals? When you adopt a marine mammal through our adoption program you get the chance to learn more about the specific animal’s story and get updates on any re-sightings of the individual.  By adopting one of these animals, you will be able to learn more about Makena the whale, or Sally and her unique “fluke-up” behavior.  Check out our website to learn how to adopt one of these magnificent whales, or any of our other marine mammals that are available for adoption from our catalogs.

And remember, when adopting a dolphin or whale you are supporting PWF’s ongoing research, education, and conservation efforts to protect marine life. Thank you for your support!

The Results Are In: The 2017 Australia Research Recap

Another exciting whalewatch season is drawing to an end here in Hervey Bay, Australia. It has been a productive time for our Researchers-on-Board as we have continued to collect photo-identification data and educate our guests on the importance of the research upon which Pacific Whale Foundation has built its legacy.

From the beginning of the whalewatch season on July 15 through September 30, Ocean Defender has embarked on 96 whalewatches, which have served as platforms for our researchers to collect photos and observational data from the humpback whales.  Those trips have taken us a total of 3,767 nautical miles to encounter 402 pods of humpback whales. The researchers double as Marine Naturalists on these trips, engaging the public as part of our internationally recognized model of responsible whalewatching.

After photographs and data are collected in the field by our team in Australia, the dedicated research staff at our Maui headquarters analyzes and catalogs it, adding to our ever-expanding knowledge of these humpback whales. This season has yielded over 1,300 photos and some interesting additions to our South Pacific humpback whale catalog.

Our Research Department has added 18 new individual humpback whales from this whalewatching season to our catalog, which currently contains approximately 6,000 individual whales from several habitat areas.

Three humpback whales seen during the 2017 season were matched to our catalog: #3586, #2177,  and #0680. Whale #3586 was first sighted in 2006 before being sighted again in 2008 and 2017. Whale #2177, a female, was first sighted in 1999, seen with her calf in 2007, and seen without a calf in 2008, 2010, and 2017. Whale #0680, named “Uluru”, is one of our adoption animals, and she has had a calf for all of her sightings: 1989, 1993, 1995, 2006, and 2017.

Each individual added to the catalog or re-sighted provides us with more information that we can use to learn about these whales’ migrations, breeding characteristics, and life histories. Hervey Bay represents a unique habitat as a migratory stopover, and our researchers are interested in determining how humpback whales, especially mothers with calves, use this area. Pacific Whale Foundation additionally invites you to participate in our research as a citizen scientist. Whether you would like to submit your own fluke photos or assist in analyzing humpback whale photo-ID images with Match My Whale, we invite you to help with this exciting and important research project.

Celebrate Endangered Species Day

Endangered Species Day is a celebration of the nation’s wildlife and wild places and is an opportunity for people of all ages to learn about the importance of protecting endangered species. Started in 2006 by the United States Congress, Endangered Species Day occurs on the 3rd Friday of May to inspire people to take action in their everyday lives to help protect endangered species.

At Pacific Whale Foundation we research two endangered species: humpback whales and false killer whales.

As with many endangered species, both humpback whales and false killer whales are endangered due to human activities. The North Pacific population of humpback whales was hunted until only a few hundred individuals remained. Although their population has recovered immensely—recent estimates suggest approximately 20,000 humpbacks in the North Pacific—they and other large whale species are still at risk of vessel collisions and entanglement in fishing gear. Our current research on humpback whales aims to reduce the risk of these collisions by determining which factors contribute to detectability of the whales.

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